SOS 2011


27-30 April 2011
Southbank Centre, London

Speakers

Wednesday

PIERS PLOWRIGHT
Renowned documentary features producer for BBC Radio
THE VOICE AND ITS MYSTERIES
Radio producer, Piers Plowright, considers what vocal storytelling does to us and how it does it. With clips from radio and from film soundtracks. Sometimes you may not know which is which!


ROSS BROWN

Writer, theatre sound designer and composer; Professor of Sound at Central School of Speech and Drama, University of London; author of Sound, the first of Macmillan’s Readers in Theatre Practice series
THE PICTURESQUE OF SOUND: SOUND, SCENE AND THEATRES OF RECEPTION
Pictures are never experienced silently and their full meaning is contingent on the sonic time-space of the observing body, which continuously breathes, swallows, beats and hums, while the psychoacoustic mind aurally processes kinetic acoustic circumstance and auditory thought. This session considers live theatre as a model for understanding the aural space of imagery, looking at changing audience and production practices from the wooden ‘o’s of Elizabethan London, through sounding and then the silencing of melodramatic underscoring and the changing nature of sound effects as they moved from a classical to a modern acoustemology.


STEPHEN DEUTSCH introduces The New Soundtrack journal


FRED FRITH

Songwriter, composer, improviser and teacher in the world-renowned music department of Mills College in Oakland, California and at the Musik Akademie in Basel, Switzerland.
TRUE OR FALSE
Fred Frith talks about his work in the field of documentary film, contrasting it with his fiction film experiences and reflecting, among other things, on different approaches to creating atmosphere and supporting character.


SCANNER

Robin Rimbaud, aka Scanner, is a conceptual artist, writer, and composer working in London, whose works traverse the experimental terrain between sound, space, image and form. www.scannerdot.com
LISTENING AT THE PICTURES
Scanner presents a variety of works that use the moving image as a blend of the aural and the visual.

Thursday

RANDY THOM from Beijing
Academy Award-winning Sound Designer and Re-Recording Mixer (Best Sound for The Right Stuff and Best Achievement in Sound Editing for The Incredibles) whose career spans radio, music and feature film sound design – via video link
SCREENWRITING FOR SOUND
What are some ways a writer for a film or video project uses sound to help tell the story.


JENNIFER BIZLEY and ANDREW KING

Bizley is a neuroscientist at the Ear Institute, University College London, and King is Professor of Neurophysiology and co-directs the Auditory Neuroscience Group at Oxford University.
MERGING WHAT YOU HEAR AND WHAT YOU SEE –
FROM NERVE CELLS TO THE MOVIE THEATRE

Our ears and eyes provide us with independent information about sound and sight. But how is this information seamlessly combined to create our unified perception of the world? Using situations where auditory and visual information are put in conflict, we will explore how the resulting illusory percepts can inform our understanding of how the brain integrates multisensory signals and discuss the neural processing that is thought to be involved.


TREVOR JONES 

Trevor is known for his scores to Angel Heart, Mississippi BurningSea of Love,In the Name of the FatherThe Last of the Mohicans and Notting Hill.
A FILMMAKER WHO WORKS IN MUSIC – Jones dissects his approach for analysing a narrative scene for music, integrating his musical interpretation with the director’s vision.


JO ANN KAPLAN

Filmmaker, film editor and artist, editing tutor at the National Film and Television School (UK)
ANNABELLE PANGBORN
Composer, sound designer and Head of Editing, Sound and Music at the National Film and Television School (UK)
GRAHAM HADFIELD
Composer
SYNCHRONICITY
What is sync sound? When we talk about sound on or with film, what do we mean by ‘in sync’? In discussion with Annabelle Pangborn and Graham Hadfield, Jo Ann Kaplan uses her films,Onetwothree and Watching Paint Dry, to investigate the fundamental association between sound, music and image.

Friday

KAYE MORTLEY
Independent radio documentary maker, Australian by birth, based in Paris
Reality, once conceptualized, is no longer ‘reality’, says Robert Bresson…Which is perhaps why I use sound to try and write the real world.
Sound: a language beyond “language”.


BERNHARD LEITNER

Austrian architect and sound artist
SoundBodyBodySpace
Sound Spaces are not just spaces in which sound can be heard. Rather, it is sound itself that creates the space and its special qualities. Therefore the experience of hearing not only enables us to experience the space around us, they can also make it possible to experience physical space as an “inner” space. Discussion of my work (laboratory research in the field of acoustical perception, sonic sculpture and architecture as well as urban interventions) will show the potentials of sensual experience that we are barely conscious of because they are either lost or have remained unknown as possibilities.


GASTON KABORÉ

Filmmaker (director of Wend KuuniBuud Yam), writer, screenwriter and formerly head of the National Film Board of Burkina Faso and the PanAfrican Federation of Filmmakers. Gaston will be discussing his films with ROD STONEMAN, exploring the influences that create “the fragile equilibrium that exists between images, sound and music”.
Gaston will introduce his film, Wend Kuuni, at the BFI Southbank on Friday, 29 April at 1830.


ROBERT ROBERTSON

Opera composer, filmmaker and author of Eisenstein on the Audiovisual
DO THE EISENSTEIN THING
Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing in the light of Eisenstein’s ideas on the montage of music, image and sound in cinema.

Saturday

MEET THE SPEAKERS
An opportunity to ask further questions in an informal gathering in the Purcell Room Foyer. Until 11.30.


GILLIAN MOORE

Head of Contemporary Culture at Southbank Centre
EDGAR VARESE
Moore has been besotted with the music of Varese ever since leading projects in London Schools in the early 1980s, introducing young people to this austere and yet hugely appealing music. Varese was fifty years ahead of his time, imagining electronic music a generation before it was possible. She will talk specifically about some of Varese’s music, as well as about some of the musicians it has influenced: from Zappa to Birtwistle and Kaija Saariaho. In discussion with Scanner.


RICK ALTMAN

Professor of Cinema and Comparative Literature at the University of Iowa, Altman is well known for his research into film sound, film genre and narrative theories. He is the author of Film/Genre and Silent Film Sound and editor of the influential text, Sound Theory, Sound Practice.
TWO OR THREE THINGS WE THOUGHT WE KNEW ABOUT SILENT FILM

CHRISTOPHER FRAYLING
Educator, historian, broadcaster and former Rector of the Royal College of Art
ONCE UPON A TIME ON THE SOUNDTRACK
Taking the opening sequence of Sergio Leone’s’ Once Upon a Time in the West as a starting-point – its origins, development, and its many references to film culture – this talk explores the creative potential of post-synchronisation: not as an afterthought, or a piece of necessary tidying up, but as an example of “sound design” in its own right. Leone once said that “sound is 40% of the film experience – at least”. Clint Eastwood has added that this was one of the key lessons he learned from working in Italy. The talk explores some of the implications of this insight today.